RE: 10 Big Ethical Issues In Video Games That #GamerGate Won’t Touch

This is a reply to 10 Big Ethical Issues In Video Games That #GamerGate Won’t Touch

10. App stores discouraging developers who want to make games that deal with politics or sexuality.

That’s not the real problem. The real problem is that you can not publish apps outside the store.

9. Nothing tells women, “we’re not here to speak to you,” like hosting a networking event at a strip club.

Sex sells.
Besides, equality of chance doesn’t mean equality of outcome.

8. There is often no legal recourse for a small developer if a large studio clones a game’s design wholesale.

This concerns the industry itself, not the consumer. It’s not specific to the game industry. Examples like DayZ / WarZ (Infestation: survivor stories) prove that it doesn’t work. It mostly occurs in freemium mobile games.

7. Publications hungry for content, eager to pass off promotional material as news, presenting touched up renders as in-game screenshots.

This is not specific to game journalism and #GamerGate do address them by demanding ethics.

6. ‘Crunch time’ and other exploitative labor practices.

This concerns the industry itself, not the consumer. People would make more money and work less time in a regular IT job. If they want to work in the video-games industry so bad, they can create their own company, become indie or do it as a hobby.

5. The use of conflict minerals and other ethical violations in the supply chain.

This concerns the industry itself, not the consumer. This is not specific to video games, in fact, it concerns any high tech device.

4. Publications that brazenly accept payment for advertorial ‘sponsored reviews.’

Exactly the same issue as 7.

3. Hiring practices that treat developers as disposable.

This concerns the industry itself, not the consumer. Not specific to video games industry.

2. The troubling relationship between video game developers and arms manufacturers.

This concerns the industry itself, not the consumer. This also exists in the movie industry.

1. When you buy games, you don’t necessarily own them—and may not be able to play them in the future.

This is not specific to video games, the whole software industry suffers from it.